bog|gle

bog|gle
bog|gle1 «BOG uhl», verb, -gled, -gling, noun.
–v.i.
1. to hold back; raise difficulties or objections; hesitate: »

Father boggled at the suggestion at first, but finally agreed to do the job.

SYNONYM(S): waver, shrink, demur.
2. to be overwhelmed with wonder, shock, or the like: »

His mind boggled at the thought of inheriting a million dollars.

3. = blunder. (Cf.blunder)
4. to jump with fright; shy.
–v.t.
1. to bungle; botch: »

He boggled his first attempt at carpentry.

2. to overwhelm with wonder, shock, or the like: »

The vastness of the universe boggles the imagination.

–n.
1. a blunder; bungle; botch.
2. the act of boggling.
[probably < bogle]
bog´gler, noun.
bog´gling|ly, adverb.
bog|gle2 «BOG uhl», noun.
= bogle. (Cf.bogle)

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • bog·gle — …   Useful english dictionary

  • bog — bog; bog·gart; bog·gy; bog·head; bog·land; bog·let; bog·o·mil; bog·o·mil·ism; bog·sucker; bog·trotter; che·bog; em·bog; iam·bog·ra·pher; phle·bog·ra·phy; plum·bog; to·bog·gan·er; bog·gle; to·bog·gan; bog·o·mile; rhom·bog·e·nous; to·bog·gan·ist; …   English syllables

  • gle — adan·gle; ae·gle; ajan·gle; ajin·gle; an·gle·ber·ry; An·gle·doz·er; an·gle·sey; an·gle·site; an·gle·ton; an·gle·twitch; ar·gle; ar·gle bar·gle; atin·gle; bo·gle; bun·gle·some; bur·gle; can·gle; cin·gle; com·min·gle; crin·gle; crin·gle cran·gle;… …   English syllables

  • boggle — bog·gle …   English syllables

  • boggle — bog|gle [ˈbɔgəl US ˈba: ] v [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: Perhaps from bogle; BOGEY] the/your mind boggles also sth makes the/your mind boggle also sth boggles the/your mind informal if your mind boggles when you think of something, it is difficult… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • boggle — bog|gle [ bagl ] verb 1. ) intransitive or transitive if the mind boggles, or something boggles the mind, you cannot imagine it because it is too strange, unpleasant, or confusing: To think that now the company is worth more than $1.3 billion… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • boggle — I bog•gle [[t]ˈbɒg əl[/t]] v. gled, gling, n. 1) to overwhelm or bewilder, as with magnitude or complexity: boggles the imagination[/ex] 2) to bungle; botch 3) to be overwhelmed 4) to hesitate because of scruples, fear, etc 5) an act of boggling… …   From formal English to slang

  • Boggle — Bog gle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Boggled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Boggling}.] [ See {Bogle}, n.] 1. To stop or hesitate as if suddenly frightened, or in doubt, or impeded by unforeseen difficulties; to take alarm; to exhibit hesitancy and indecision.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Boggle — Bog gle, v. t. To embarrass with difficulties; to make a bungle or botch of. [Local, U. S.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Boggled — Boggle Bog gle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Boggled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Boggling}.] [ See {Bogle}, n.] 1. To stop or hesitate as if suddenly frightened, or in doubt, or impeded by unforeseen difficulties; to take alarm; to exhibit hesitancy and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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